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A waitress wears a face mask while serving at Langer's Delicatessen-Restaurant in Los Angeles on June 15.

A waitress wears a face mask while serving at Langer’s Delicatessen-Restaurant in Los Angeles on June 15.

FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images

A waitress wears a face mask while serving at Langer's Delicatessen-Restaurant in Los Angeles on June 15.

A waitress wears a face mask while serving at Langer’s Delicatessen-Restaurant in Los Angeles on June 15.

FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images

The arguments for and against eliminating the ‘subminimum wage’ for tipped workers in Illinois

In October Chicago became the largest U.S. city to outlaw a lower minimum wage for tipped workers. Now Illinois may follow suit.

A waitress wears a face mask while serving at Langer’s Delicatessen-Restaurant in Los Angeles on June 15.

FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images

   

Democratic lawmakers in Springfield have introduced legislation that would get rid of the lower minimum wage for the state’s tipped workers, something advocates for higher pay call the “subminimum wage.”

So, how likely is it that the proposal becomes law? And what could it mean for restaurant owners, workers and diners?

Reset learns about the legislation being considered in Springfield and hears from an opponent and a proponent.

GUESTS: Audra Wilson, president and CEO, Shriver Center on Poverty Law

Mario Ponce, owner of Takito Brands restaurants

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