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Man talks on flip phone in 2004

Marcus Devin talks with his flip phone at a Chicago Best Buy store in 2004. A niche market around flip phones has started gaining momentum.

Nam Y. Huh

Man talks on flip phone in 2004

Marcus Devin talks with his flip phone at a Chicago Best Buy store in 2004. A niche market around flip phones has started gaining momentum.

Nam Y. Huh

Would you trade your smartphone for a dumb phone?

Flip phones are back in style. Reset discusses solutions to curbing our Smartphone addictions.

Marcus Devin talks with his flip phone at a Chicago Best Buy store in 2004. A niche market around flip phones has started gaining momentum.

Nam Y. Huh

   

Nine out of ten people in the U.S. own a smartphone, according to the Pew Research Center. As our society becomes built around this technology, some people are nostalgic for a different time — where smartphones didn’t dominate daily life.

There’s a burgeoning movement to switch to flip phones and other so-called “dumb phones” that have less flashy features. Other people have decided to create technology that can restrict the distracting, addicting features of smartphones.

Reset discusses with a pair of people who have decided to curb their smartphone capabilities — or get rid of them entirely.

GUESTS: Seth Lavin, Chicago Public Schools principal who got a flip phone more than half a year ago

TJ Driver, co-founder of Brick, a device that temporarily blocks apps from your phone

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