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A still shot from the docuseries “Shame of Chicago, Shame of the Nation.” In the 1950s, Black homeowners were often confronted by racism and violent resistance from white neighbors in Chicago.

A still shot from the docuseries “Shame of Chicago, Shame of the Nation.” In the 1950s, Black homeowners were often confronted by racism and violent resistance from white neighbors in Chicago.

A still shot from the docuseries “Shame of Chicago, Shame of the Nation.” In the 1950s, Black homeowners were often confronted by racism and violent resistance from white neighbors in Chicago.

A still shot from the docuseries “Shame of Chicago, Shame of the Nation.” In the 1950s, Black homeowners were often confronted by racism and violent resistance from white neighbors in Chicago.

How Chicago’s racial housing segregation took billions from Black Americans

A still shot from the docuseries “Shame of Chicago, Shame of the Nation.” In the 1950s, Black homeowners were often confronted by racism and violent resistance from white neighbors in Chicago.

   

Housing segregation in Chicago was not an accident. It was a system that was intentionally created to keep people of color, specifically Black families, out of white neighborhoods.

A new four-part documentary series called “Shame of Chicago, Shame of the Nation” explores Chicago’s legacy of racial housing segregation and how its impacts can still be felt today.

Reset learns more with one of the minds behind the project.

GUESTS: Bruce Orenstein, lead producer, director for “Shame of Chicago, Shame of the Nation

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