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LSU's Angel Reese, left, and Iowa's Caitlin Clark pose for a photo before the WNBA basketball draft Monday in New York.

LSU’s Angel Reese, left, and Iowa’s Caitlin Clark pose for a photo before the WNBA basketball draft Monday in New York.

Adam Hunger/AP

LSU's Angel Reese, left, and Iowa's Caitlin Clark pose for a photo before the WNBA basketball draft Monday in New York.

LSU’s Angel Reese, left, and Iowa’s Caitlin Clark pose for a photo before the WNBA basketball draft Monday in New York.

Adam Hunger/AP

The Sky and Red Stars exemplify the complex rise of women’s pro sports in Chicago

Chicago’s women’s basketball and women’s soccer start their seasons with much excitement, but also many questions about the future.

LSU’s Angel Reese, left, and Iowa’s Caitlin Clark pose for a photo before the WNBA basketball draft Monday in New York.

Adam Hunger/AP

   

Interest in women’s sports in the U.S. has exploded in the past few years. And the hype around Chicago’s Sky and Red Stars is no different. Their respective seasons have kicked off. But it’s not all championship rings and number one draft picks — women in pro sports still face barriers, in Chicago and everywhere.

Reset sits down with a sports reporter and superfan to look at not just this season, but the years to come.

GUESTS: Annie Costabile, Chicago Sun-Times Sky and Red Stars reporter

Marquita Wiggins, WBEZ audience engagement manager, Chicago Sky fan and creator of Quita Loves Sports

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