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Cash bills stacked on top of each other.

Cash bills are stacked on top of each other. Chicago suburbs are asking for a wider share of the Local Government Distributive Fund.

Ted Shaffrey/AP Photo

Cash bills stacked on top of each other.

Cash bills are stacked on top of each other. Chicago suburbs are asking for a wider share of the Local Government Distributive Fund.

Ted Shaffrey/AP Photo

Illinois suburbs want more money from the state

The Local Government Distributive Fund may sound dry, but local leaders say it plays a crucial role in keeping their cities, towns and villages afloat.

Cash bills are stacked on top of each other. Chicago suburbs are asking for a wider share of the Local Government Distributive Fund.

Ted Shaffrey/AP Photo

   

In 2011, the state lowered the share that municipalities get from the state income tax from 10% to around 6%, and now, suburban leaders from Cook and surrounding counties are asking for the LGDF to go back up. Mayors use this money to fund their general operating budgets. On Monday, 50 mayors and suburban leaders gathered at a press conference to ask the state for an increase.

Reset learns about why many suburbs are calling on lawmakers in Springfield to give their cities and towns a bigger piece of the pie.

GUESTS: Jerry Bennett, Palos Hills mayor, president of the Southwest Conference of Mayors

Ralph Martire, executive director, Center for Tax and Budget Accountability

Alex Degman, WBEZ statehouse reporter

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