Why Adler Scientists Are Excited About Latest Mars Landing

NASA InSight
An engineer smiles next to an image of Mars sent from the InSight lander shortly after it landed on Mars in the mission support area of the space flight operation facility at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory Monday in Pasadena, Calif. Al Seib/Los Angeles Times via AP, Pool / Associated Press
NASA InSight
An engineer smiles next to an image of Mars sent from the InSight lander shortly after it landed on Mars in the mission support area of the space flight operation facility at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory Monday in Pasadena, Calif. Al Seib/Los Angeles Times via AP, Pool / Associated Press

Why Adler Scientists Are Excited About Latest Mars Landing

NASA on Monday landed another gadget on Mars. If it all seems common or normal at this point… it shouldn’t. The InSight spacecraft traveled more than 300 million miles for seven months at speeds of about 6,000 miles per hour. And it touched down exactly where it was supposed to land.

Michelle Nichols of the Adler Planetarium talks about NASA’s latest mission and why it’s important for science, and for understanding life on Earth.

GUEST: Michelle Nichols, director of public observing at the Adler Planetarium

LEARN MORE: New Mars lander safely touches down. What happens now? (National Geographic 11/26/18)

NASA’s InSight Lander Has Touched Down On Mars (CNN 11/27/18)