Can We Save the Planet and Remain Capitalist?

United Nations Climate
FILE - In this Monday, Sept. 17, 2018 file photo, a resident stands on the roof of her house amidst flooding brought about by Typhoon Mangkhut which barreled into northeastern Philippines during the weekend and inundated low-lying areas in its 900-kilometer wide cloud band, in Calumpit township, Bulacan province north of Manila, Philippines. With global temperatures rising, superstorms taking their deadly toll and a year-end deadline to firm up the Paris climate deal, leaders at this year’s U.N. General Assembly are feeling a sense of urgency to keep up the momentum on combating climate change. Bullit Marquez / AP Photo
United Nations Climate
FILE - In this Monday, Sept. 17, 2018 file photo, a resident stands on the roof of her house amidst flooding brought about by Typhoon Mangkhut which barreled into northeastern Philippines during the weekend and inundated low-lying areas in its 900-kilometer wide cloud band, in Calumpit township, Bulacan province north of Manila, Philippines. With global temperatures rising, superstorms taking their deadly toll and a year-end deadline to firm up the Paris climate deal, leaders at this year’s U.N. General Assembly are feeling a sense of urgency to keep up the momentum on combating climate change. Bullit Marquez / AP Photo

Can We Save the Planet and Remain Capitalist?

According to a new report commissioned by the UN, the only hope for a sustainable future lies in a radical and urgent restructuring of the global economy. The research think tank BIOS hopes this report will shape the direction of the UN’s Global Sustainable Development Report slated to come out next year. The paper suggests that climate change, rising inequality, and slow economic growth are caused by conventional capitalist markets. Joining us to discuss the connection between capitalism and and this ecological and social crisis is Paavo Järvensivu. A senior researcher at BIOS Research Center.