A Look At Spain’s Anti-Terrorism Efforts

A relative of a bombing victim prays in El Pozo train station in Madrid, Spain, Sunday, March 11, 2007.
A relative of a bombing victim prays in El Pozo train station in Madrid, Spain, Sunday, March 11, 2007. Madrid is commemorating the third anniversary of Spain's worst terrorist attack which killed 191 people and wounded more than 1,700. The bombing attacks were claimed by Muslim militants who said they had acted on behalf of al-Qaida to avenge the presence of Spanish troops in Iraq. Daniel Ochoa de Olza / AP Photos
A relative of a bombing victim prays in El Pozo train station in Madrid, Spain, Sunday, March 11, 2007.
A relative of a bombing victim prays in El Pozo train station in Madrid, Spain, Sunday, March 11, 2007. Madrid is commemorating the third anniversary of Spain's worst terrorist attack which killed 191 people and wounded more than 1,700. The bombing attacks were claimed by Muslim militants who said they had acted on behalf of al-Qaida to avenge the presence of Spanish troops in Iraq. Daniel Ochoa de Olza / AP Photos

A Look At Spain’s Anti-Terrorism Efforts

After terrorists killed 13 people and injured 50 in and around Barcelona last week, Spanish authorities are re-evaluating their counterterrorism efforts. After a 2004 Al-Qaeda attack left nearly 200 dead in Madrid, Spain has had a reputation for going hard after Islamist terrorists. 

While it seems that France, Germany, and the UK have been at the primary targets of terrorism in recent years, it’s uncertain whether the relative safety of Spain is thanks to effective policing or just chance. Observers are also wondering what role Spain’s former colony, Morocco, has in harboring ISIS sympathizers. The alleged attacker was born in Morocco, a traditionally Muslim country. To discuss, we’re joined by Krishnadev Calamur, a senior editor at The Atlantic. His recent piece is called “How Did Spain Avoid Terrorism Before Barcelona?