Bernard-Henri Lévy On The West’s Obligation To Kurdistan

An Iraqi displaced woman who fled with her family from the Iraqi northern city of Mosul, prays after receiving a copy of the Quran from a Kurdish local charity organization at a camp in Khazer on Saturday, June 28, 2014.
An Iraqi displaced woman who fled with her family from the Iraqi northern city of Mosul, prays after receiving a copy of the Quran from a Kurdish local charity organization at a camp in Khazer on Saturday, June 28, 2014. AP Photo/Hussein Malla
An Iraqi displaced woman who fled with her family from the Iraqi northern city of Mosul, prays after receiving a copy of the Quran from a Kurdish local charity organization at a camp in Khazer on Saturday, June 28, 2014.
An Iraqi displaced woman who fled with her family from the Iraqi northern city of Mosul, prays after receiving a copy of the Quran from a Kurdish local charity organization at a camp in Khazer on Saturday, June 28, 2014. AP Photo/Hussein Malla

Bernard-Henri Lévy On The West’s Obligation To Kurdistan

Bernard-Henri Lévy is one of the most influential public intellectuals of our time, who has most recently taken up the issue of Kurdish independence.

In op-eds for Foreign Policy, The Wall Street Journal, and Tablet Magazine, Lévy has framed the issue as a moral imperative for the West to re-establish a sense of ethnic sovereignty in the Middle East. He says that the borders of the Middle East have been drawn with colonialism, and that the right to democracy and self-determination should be upheld by Western countries that celebrate the same concepts.

Lévy is most recently the author of The Genius of Judaism, which celebrates the Jewish intellectual tradition which he seeks to continue. In the same vein, Lévy believes that Kurdistan has much to offer out of the Muslim intellectual tradition that can enrich the Middle East in the era of ISIS.

He joins Worldview to discuss Kurdistan and ethnic sovereignty.