Black Mothers On The Lasting Impact Of Chicago’s Gun Violence

“You get tired of turning the news every day to hear about some young person losing their life to gun violence,” said Natalie Manning.

Black Mothers On The Lasting Impact Of Chicago’s Gun Violence
A pedestrian walks by a long standing memorial to victims of gun violence outside St. Sabina Catholic Church in the Auburn Gresham neighborhood in Chicago, Thursday, Aug. 27, 2020. David Goldman) / AP Photo
Black Mothers On The Lasting Impact Of Chicago’s Gun Violence
A pedestrian walks by a long standing memorial to victims of gun violence outside St. Sabina Catholic Church in the Auburn Gresham neighborhood in Chicago, Thursday, Aug. 27, 2020. David Goldman) / AP Photo

Black Mothers On The Lasting Impact Of Chicago’s Gun Violence

“You get tired of turning the news every day to hear about some young person losing their life to gun violence,” said Natalie Manning.

At the time of nationwide racial justice protests in the summer of 2020, journalist Arionne Nettles said she couldn’t help but notice the relatively little recognition Black mothers received for their efforts to deter gun violence in their communities. And so, she spent eight months speaking with Black mothers across the U.S. about how gun violence has shaped their lives and the solutions they envision to the ongoing crisis.

Reset talks to Nettles about her New York Times piece, Black Mothers Are the Real Experts on the Toll of Gun Violence, and to two of the Chicago mothers she interviewed for their solutions.

GUESTS: Arionne Nettles, journalism lecturer at Northwestern University’s Medill School

Chez Smith, founder of the Gyrls in the H.O.O.D. Foundation

Natalie Manning, co-founder and the executive director of This Is Life