Can New Sanctions Strategy for Venezuela and Iran Be Effective?

A neighbor stand next to a pile of subsidized food to be distributed under a government program named "CLAP," in the Catia district of Caracas, Venezuela, Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019. An independent U.N. human rights monitor says economic sanctions are compounding a "grave crisis" in Venezuela.
A neighbor stand next to a pile of subsidized food to be distributed under a government program named "CLAP," in the Catia district of Caracas, Venezuela, Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019. An independent U.N. human rights monitor says economic sanctions are compounding a "grave crisis" in Venezuela. Rodrigo Abd / AP Photo
A neighbor stand next to a pile of subsidized food to be distributed under a government program named "CLAP," in the Catia district of Caracas, Venezuela, Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019. An independent U.N. human rights monitor says economic sanctions are compounding a "grave crisis" in Venezuela.
A neighbor stand next to a pile of subsidized food to be distributed under a government program named "CLAP," in the Catia district of Caracas, Venezuela, Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019. An independent U.N. human rights monitor says economic sanctions are compounding a "grave crisis" in Venezuela. Rodrigo Abd / AP Photo

Can New Sanctions Strategy for Venezuela and Iran Be Effective?

The United States often considers economic sanctions preferable to outright military conflict when engaging with opposing nations, and the practice itself dates back to relations between ancient Greek city-states. But with the U.S. imposing stricter sanctions on Venezuela, after years of imposing restrictions on the country, can sanctions still be an effective tool? With U.S. diplomats strong-arming EU companies to enforce sanctions on Iran, can the pressure even be self-defeating? We’re going to consider these dilemmas today with George Lopez, professor emeritus of peace studies at the University of Notre Dame’s Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies.