Celebrating the legacy of the Black Press

Celebrating the legacy of the Black Press

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In 1827 the first Black newspaper, Freedom’s Journal, led by editors Samuel Cornish and John Russwurm laid the foundation for the community to be informed about their own. The usual channels of media, mainly newspapers, often denigrating African Americans and questioned their right to exist. Other times, they were simply ignored. In 1941, a meeting of leading Black publishers from across the nation was held in Chicago to unify for the common mission of Black journalism. Out of that meeting, the National Negro Publishers Association was formed. Fifteen years later, the trade association was renamed the National Newspaper Publishers Association. It is the premiere association of the Black Press. Over the last 188 years, publishers, journalists and cartoonists have contributed to the Black Press. Dorothy Leavell, owner and publisher of the Chicago Crusader and Gary Crusader, and Glenn Reedus, former managing editor of the Chicago Defender and the Chicago Crusader join us to discuss the legacy of the Black Press.