Closing The Gap On Food Insecurity: Hunger, Shame And Stigma

Reset talks to women who have been directly affected by food insecurity during the pandemic, and the shame they felt facing barren cupboards.

Food Insecurity
In this Tuesday, May 12, 2020, photo, residents from all walks of life line up for a food giveaway sponsored by the Greater Chicago Food Depository in the Auburn Gresham neighborhood of Chicago. More and more people are struggling with hunger as the COVID-19 pandemic causes mass unemployment. Charles Rex Arbogast / AP Photo
Food Insecurity
In this Tuesday, May 12, 2020, photo, residents from all walks of life line up for a food giveaway sponsored by the Greater Chicago Food Depository in the Auburn Gresham neighborhood of Chicago. More and more people are struggling with hunger as the COVID-19 pandemic causes mass unemployment. Charles Rex Arbogast / AP Photo

Closing The Gap On Food Insecurity: Hunger, Shame And Stigma

Reset talks to women who have been directly affected by food insecurity during the pandemic, and the shame they felt facing barren cupboards.

All this week, Reset examines why people are going hungry in Illinois and talks to those working to solve the problem. It’s the latest in our series “Closing the Gap” where we explore disparities in the Chicago area — and solutions to those disparities.

During this hunger crisis, women and children are getting hit particularly hard. Women face higher unemployment, and school closures mean many children are missing out on school-sponsored meals. One in four children could face food insecurity by the end of this year, according to Feeding America.

Reset talks to women with children who have struggled to feed their families about where they turned to for help. We also hear from the head of a suburban food bank about how food insecurity in the suburbs is skyrocketing.

GUESTS: Jackie Kabir, coordinator with the New Life Covenant Southeast Food Pantry

April Harris, Chicago resident

Julie Yurko, CEO of the Northern Illinois Food Bank