Coronavirus Isolation Leads To Increased Domestic Violence

Virus Outbreak Domestic Violence
Police caution tape surrounds a playground in Lake Oswego, Ore., on Tuesday, March 24, 2020, the day after Gov. Kate Brown issued a statewide stay-at-home order that closed many businesses, as well as all playgrounds, basketball courts and sport courts. As families across the country and the globe hunker down at home, it's another danger, equally insidious if less immediately obvious, that has advocates deeply concerned: A potential spike in domestic violence, as victims spend day after day trapped at home with their abusers. AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus
Virus Outbreak Domestic Violence
Police caution tape surrounds a playground in Lake Oswego, Ore., on Tuesday, March 24, 2020, the day after Gov. Kate Brown issued a statewide stay-at-home order that closed many businesses, as well as all playgrounds, basketball courts and sport courts. As families across the country and the globe hunker down at home, it's another danger, equally insidious if less immediately obvious, that has advocates deeply concerned: A potential spike in domestic violence, as victims spend day after day trapped at home with their abusers. AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus

Coronavirus Isolation Leads To Increased Domestic Violence

Reset hears about the unique obstacles that victims of domestic violence are up against during the outbreak of COVID-19.

GUEST: Stephanie Love-Patterson, executive director of Connections for Abused Women and their Children (CAWC)

Carol Gall, executive director of Sarah’s Inn