Eyes On Mexico: Is The New President Upholding His Human Rights Promise?

Women dressed to depict "La Llorana" or "The Weeping Woman" take part in a street theater act to remember the 43 missing students from the Isidro Burgos rural teachers college, in Mexico City, Saturday, March 4, 2017. The 43 students at the teachers' college of Ayotzinapa disappeared in September 2014 and have not been heard from since they were taken by local police in in the city of Iguala in southern Guerrero state.
Women dressed to depict "La Llorana" or "The Weeping Woman" take part in a street theater act to remember the 43 missing students from the Isidro Burgos rural teachers college, in Mexico City, Saturday, March 4, 2017. The 43 students at the teachers' college of Ayotzinapa disappeared in September 2014 and have not been heard from since they were taken by local police in in the city of Iguala in southern Guerrero state. Marco Ugarte / AP Photo
Women dressed to depict "La Llorana" or "The Weeping Woman" take part in a street theater act to remember the 43 missing students from the Isidro Burgos rural teachers college, in Mexico City, Saturday, March 4, 2017. The 43 students at the teachers' college of Ayotzinapa disappeared in September 2014 and have not been heard from since they were taken by local police in in the city of Iguala in southern Guerrero state.
Women dressed to depict "La Llorana" or "The Weeping Woman" take part in a street theater act to remember the 43 missing students from the Isidro Burgos rural teachers college, in Mexico City, Saturday, March 4, 2017. The 43 students at the teachers' college of Ayotzinapa disappeared in September 2014 and have not been heard from since they were taken by local police in in the city of Iguala in southern Guerrero state. Marco Ugarte / AP Photo

Eyes On Mexico: Is The New President Upholding His Human Rights Promise?

Just a couple of months since taking office, Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador has come under the scrutiny of civil society organizations and human rights advocates who believe he is not doing enough to combat crime and prevent human rights abuses. In light of continuing violence and homicides across the country, López Obrador’s government announced this month a new security plan through which it claims it will search for tens of thousands of people who have disappeared during Mexico’s drug war. Previous governments have passed similar legislation with little real-world impact, however. Critics are particularly eager to see if López Obrador’s government will be able to explain the fate of 43 disappeared students in Ayotzinapa. They were kidnapped in 2014 while aboard a bus also had hidden narcotics destined for Chicago. Joining us is Santiago Aguirre, the Mexican attorney representing the families of the 43 disappeared students from Ayotzinapa, as well as Susan Gzesh, the executive director of the Pozen Center for Human Rights at the University of Chicago.