Far-Right Extremists Planned To Storm Capitol Hill For Weeks Online

Pro-Trump extremists have been organizing on social media and online platforms for months as the “stop the steal” movement gained traction.

Far-Right Extremists Planned To Storm Capitol Hill For Weeks Online
In this Jan. 6, 2021, file photo, Trump supporters participate in a rally in Washington. Far-right social media users for weeks openly hinted in widely shared posts that chaos would erupt at the U.S. Capitol while Congress convened to certify the election results. John Minchillo, File / AP Photo
Far-Right Extremists Planned To Storm Capitol Hill For Weeks Online
In this Jan. 6, 2021, file photo, Trump supporters participate in a rally in Washington. Far-right social media users for weeks openly hinted in widely shared posts that chaos would erupt at the U.S. Capitol while Congress convened to certify the election results. John Minchillo, File / AP Photo

Far-Right Extremists Planned To Storm Capitol Hill For Weeks Online

Pro-Trump extremists have been organizing on social media and online platforms for months as the “stop the steal” movement gained traction.

Many were surprised by violent mob of pro-Trump supporters that invaded Capitol Hill on Wednesday. But experts say the rioting was not random and part of a larger plan to advance white supremacy.

Reset discusses what led to the violence in Washington and what motivated some of the president’s supporters to take part.

GUESTS: Kathleen Belew, assistant professor of history at the University of Chicago; author of Bring the War Home: The White Power Movement and Paramilitary America

Sheera Frenkel, New York Times reporter on cybersecurity