Fighting Opioid Abuse By Fighting Pain Without Opioids

Naloxone is used as an antidote for opiate drug overdoses
Kathy Deady holds up a dose of Naloxone Hydrochloride, commonly known by the brand name Narcan, in her Quincy, Mass., home in Feb. 2012. Naloxone is used as an antidote for opiate drug overdoses. Deady twice had to use the drug on her son, who was suffering from an overdose of heroin. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
Naloxone is used as an antidote for opiate drug overdoses
Kathy Deady holds up a dose of Naloxone Hydrochloride, commonly known by the brand name Narcan, in her Quincy, Mass., home in Feb. 2012. Naloxone is used as an antidote for opiate drug overdoses. Deady twice had to use the drug on her son, who was suffering from an overdose of heroin. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

Fighting Opioid Abuse By Fighting Pain Without Opioids

The shootings in Chicago make for dramatic headlines, as well as tweets from the president. But far more people die each year in Illinois from opioid overdoses than from homicides. Much of the opioid epidemic in our state-and across the country-is related to drugs prescribed to people trying to deal with pain. One of the ways researchers are trying to bring those numbers down is by coming up with alternative ways to manage pain.

Brigid Sweeney of Crain’s Chicago Business dives into some local universities are working toward a new understanding of—and treatment for—pain that doesn’t involve popping highly addictive pills.