Former Mexico Security Chief Talks Immigration and Organized Crime

Mexico 3
Miguel Nieves, center right, a member of an Argentine Forensic Anthropology Team speaks, during a news conference with member of his team and relatives of the missing 43 students in Mexico City, Tuesday Feb. 9, 2016. The team announced they have determined there is no physical evidence to conclude that 43 students who disappeared in southern Mexico in 2014 were incinerated at a trash dump as government investigators initially claimed. Eduardo Verdugo / AP Photo
Mexico 3
Miguel Nieves, center right, a member of an Argentine Forensic Anthropology Team speaks, during a news conference with member of his team and relatives of the missing 43 students in Mexico City, Tuesday Feb. 9, 2016. The team announced they have determined there is no physical evidence to conclude that 43 students who disappeared in southern Mexico in 2014 were incinerated at a trash dump as government investigators initially claimed. Eduardo Verdugo / AP Photo

Former Mexico Security Chief Talks Immigration and Organized Crime

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Gustavo Mohar served as the head of Mexico’s national security intelligence agency (CISEN). He’s currently a consultant on security issues and immigration policy.

We spoke with him about organized crime in Mexico and the U.S.

We also discussed immigration. Mohar believes there are alternatives to “building a wall”.

He gave us a supply and demand labor history on immigration that demonstrates periods where labor demands were met successfully.

Mohar is in Chicago to participate in a symposium called, “E Pluribus Unum: The Immigration Conundrum,” which takes place March 3-4, 2016 at Northwestern University’s School of Law.