Human Rights Defenders Ramping Up in Chiapas, Mexico, Why is the US So Behind on Protection for Women?, Immigration Call to Action Projected onto Magnificent Mile Facade

Mexico Election Independents
FILE - In this Oct. 19, 2017 file photo, presidential hopeful Maria de Jesus Patricio, better known as MariChuy, campaigns with an escort of masked indigenous women in Oventic, in Mexico's southern state of Chiapas. MariChuy, an independent candidate, is backed by Zapatista rebels who launched an uprising in the 1990s and still have influence in the state. But her chances of getting on the ballot are slim because it appears she may not have the required number of signatures by the Feb. 19, 2018 deadline. Eduardo Verdugo / AP Photo
Mexico Election Independents
FILE - In this Oct. 19, 2017 file photo, presidential hopeful Maria de Jesus Patricio, better known as MariChuy, campaigns with an escort of masked indigenous women in Oventic, in Mexico's southern state of Chiapas. MariChuy, an independent candidate, is backed by Zapatista rebels who launched an uprising in the 1990s and still have influence in the state. But her chances of getting on the ballot are slim because it appears she may not have the required number of signatures by the Feb. 19, 2018 deadline. Eduardo Verdugo / AP Photo

Human Rights Defenders Ramping Up in Chiapas, Mexico, Why is the US So Behind on Protection for Women?, Immigration Call to Action Projected onto Magnificent Mile Facade

On today’s show:

  • The indigenous communities of Chiapas in Mexico and their fight to defend their human rights
  • The possibility of renewing the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) and what the U.S. is doing to protect women
  • Rachel Woolf’s new exhibition, “Deported: An American Division”, in collaboration with Artworks Projects for Human Rights