Illinois’ minimum wage just went up to $12 an hour. What does that mean for consumers?

Keep Your Change: This Restaurateur Says Customers Aren’t Ready To Ditch Tipping
A waiter reaches for plates at a restaurant in San Francisco. Nearly all restaurants in the U.S. operate under the tip system: Servers and those in the back of the house — chefs, line cooks, dishwashers, etc. — are paid a lower-than-average standard minimum wage, and then they earn tips to make up for the pay disparity. (Eric Risberg/AP)
Keep Your Change: This Restaurateur Says Customers Aren’t Ready To Ditch Tipping
A waiter reaches for plates at a restaurant in San Francisco. Nearly all restaurants in the U.S. operate under the tip system: Servers and those in the back of the house — chefs, line cooks, dishwashers, etc. — are paid a lower-than-average standard minimum wage, and then they earn tips to make up for the pay disparity. (Eric Risberg/AP)

Illinois’ minimum wage just went up to $12 an hour. What does that mean for consumers?

WBEZ brings you unbiased news and information. Sign up for our newsletters to stay up to date on the stories that matter.

Illinois joins 25 other states in raising their minimum wage. But the hike comes amid a national worker shortage and rising inflation costs. Reset talks to a local economist about what this could mean for employers, workers and consumers.

GUEST: Bob Bruno, director of the labor education program at the School for Labor and Employment Relations at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign