Jordan: The Challenges of Democracy-building, Syrian Refugees, and Saudi Arabia

JORDAN SYRIAN REFUGEES
Syrian refugees stand outside during a visit by U.N. refugee chief Filippo Grandi to the Zaatari Syrian Refugee Camp, in Mafraq, Jordan, Monday, Feb. 12, 2018. Grandi said the number of Syrian refugees deported from Jordan to their war-ravaged homeland has “decreased dramatically” in recent months, in part because of appeals for more careful reviews of cases. Raad Adayleh / AP Photo
JORDAN SYRIAN REFUGEES
Syrian refugees stand outside during a visit by U.N. refugee chief Filippo Grandi to the Zaatari Syrian Refugee Camp, in Mafraq, Jordan, Monday, Feb. 12, 2018. Grandi said the number of Syrian refugees deported from Jordan to their war-ravaged homeland has “decreased dramatically” in recent months, in part because of appeals for more careful reviews of cases. Raad Adayleh / AP Photo

Jordan: The Challenges of Democracy-building, Syrian Refugees, and Saudi Arabia

In the past couple of years, Jordan has been greatly affected by ongoing conflict happening in surrounding areas. Its neighboring countries, like Syria, Israel, Iraq, and Saudi Arabia have all contributed to mass tension within the country. Notably, Jordan has become a central to hosting Syrian refugees within the Zaatari camp, located in Jordan’s fourth largest city. Joining us to discuss Jordan’s role in the Middle East and U.S.-Jordan relationships is Rana Sweis. Sweis is a Jordanian journalist covering political, social, and refugee issues in the Middle East. She’s a frequent contributor to the New York Times. Sweis is also founder and managing director of Wishbox Media, and her latest book is Voices of Jordan, a compilation of stories about Jordan and the Middle East told through the lives of ordinary people.