Local Music Venue Owners Reflect On Pandemic Year

Virus Outbreak Music Venues
In this Oct. 26, 2020, photo, a bar inside a closed Tipitina's music club is converted to a window service coffee shop for revenue during the COVID-19 pandemic, in New Orleans. Music clubs all over the nation — pop culture icons like the Troubadour in West Hollywood, the Bluebird Cafe in Nashville, The Bitter End in New York's Greenwich Village — are shuttered. And owners fear for the future of their businesses and of a musical way of life. Gerald Herbert / AP Photo
Virus Outbreak Music Venues
In this Oct. 26, 2020, photo, a bar inside a closed Tipitina's music club is converted to a window service coffee shop for revenue during the COVID-19 pandemic, in New Orleans. Music clubs all over the nation — pop culture icons like the Troubadour in West Hollywood, the Bluebird Cafe in Nashville, The Bitter End in New York's Greenwich Village — are shuttered. And owners fear for the future of their businesses and of a musical way of life. Gerald Herbert / AP Photo

Local Music Venue Owners Reflect On Pandemic Year

After 15 months of COVID-19 shutdowns and attendance restrictions, city and state officials are now allowing music venues to operate at 100 percent capacity.

Reset brings on two local venue owners to discuss their experience during the past year and what they are banking on for the future.

GUESTS: Robert Gomez, owner of the Subterranean and Beat Kitchen

Bruce Finkelman, managing partner of 16” on Center