Love Chicago Books? This Archive Is For You.

GWENDOLYN BROOKS
American writer Gwendolyn Brooks, of Chicago, Ill., poses with her first book of poems titled "A Street in Bronzeville," 1945, in this undated photo at an unknown location. Brooks was awarded the 1950 Pulitzer Prize for poetry for "Annie Allen," 1949, becoming the first African American writer to win the Pulitzer Prize. AP Photo
GWENDOLYN BROOKS
American writer Gwendolyn Brooks, of Chicago, Ill., poses with her first book of poems titled "A Street in Bronzeville," 1945, in this undated photo at an unknown location. Brooks was awarded the 1950 Pulitzer Prize for poetry for "Annie Allen," 1949, becoming the first African American writer to win the Pulitzer Prize. AP Photo

Love Chicago Books? This Archive Is For You.

Few people love Chicago’s book scene as much as Adam Morgan. As the founder of the Chicago Review of Books, he’s turned that love into a career. And now, he’s taken his obsession to the next level with the launch of the new Chicago Literary Archive (think Wikipedia, but specifically for books about, by and for Chicago). Reset talks with Morgan about the new archive and what users can use it for.

GUEST: Adam Morgan, founding editor of Chicago Review of Books