Martin Luther King Jr. on Foreign Policy and Inequality

The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. gestures and shouts to his congregation in Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Ga. on April 30, 1967 as he urges America to repent and abandon what he called its “Tragic, reckless adventure in Vietnam.“
The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. gestures and shouts to his congregation in Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Ga. on April 30, 1967 as he urges America to repent and abandon what he called its "Tragic, reckless adventure in Vietnam." AP Photo
The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. gestures and shouts to his congregation in Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Ga. on April 30, 1967 as he urges America to repent and abandon what he called its “Tragic, reckless adventure in Vietnam.“
The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. gestures and shouts to his congregation in Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Ga. on April 30, 1967 as he urges America to repent and abandon what he called its "Tragic, reckless adventure in Vietnam." AP Photo

Martin Luther King Jr. on Foreign Policy and Inequality

On today’s show:

Martin Luther King Jr. delivered a sermon at New York’s Riverside Church 51 years ago on April 4th, 1967. It was called “Beyond Vietnam,” and it set the tone for Reverend King’s final year of life, which ended in assassination precisely one year later. In it, Rev. King refers to the evil triplets: Racism, Materialism, and Militarism, and how they uphold one another. Several weeks after that first speech at Riverside, he delivered another address about why he opposed the war in Vietnam at the Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, GA. We play extended excerpts from those two speeches in King’s last year, which made him reviled even within the Black community. We also make connections to the press, military, market economy, and government today with writer Vijay Prashad of Tricontinental: Institute for Social Research and chief editor of LeftWord Books.