Chicago Public Schools students behind window
Students gather behind a window that reads “Chicago Public Schools.” Most CPS graduates who immediately went on to college took more than four years to complete their education, according to data from the CPS class of 2014. Courtesy of Bill Healy / WBEZ
Chicago Public Schools students behind window
Students gather behind a window that reads “Chicago Public Schools.” Most CPS graduates who immediately went on to college took more than four years to complete their education, according to data from the CPS class of 2014. Courtesy of Bill Healy / WBEZ

Nationally, most students expect to finish college in four years, but many take longer to graduate. This is especially true for Chicago Public Schools students, according to an University of Chicago study.

Reset checks in with two co-authors of that study, as well as the CPS director of college pathways to hear about this issue — and what efforts are needed to solve it.

GUESTS: Jenny Nagaoka, co-author on UChicago “Four Years Fallacy” study and deputy director of UChicago Consortium on School Research

Alex Usher, co-author on UChicago “Four Years Fallacy” study and associate director of The To&Through Project at The University of Chicago

Brian Harris, director of college pathways for Chicago Public Schools

Chicago Public Schools students behind window
Students gather behind a window that reads “Chicago Public Schools.” Most CPS graduates who immediately went on to college took more than four years to complete their education, according to data from the CPS class of 2014. Courtesy of Bill Healy / WBEZ
Chicago Public Schools students behind window
Students gather behind a window that reads “Chicago Public Schools.” Most CPS graduates who immediately went on to college took more than four years to complete their education, according to data from the CPS class of 2014. Courtesy of Bill Healy / WBEZ

Nationally, most students expect to finish college in four years, but many take longer to graduate. This is especially true for Chicago Public Schools students, according to an University of Chicago study.

Reset checks in with two co-authors of that study, as well as the CPS director of college pathways to hear about this issue — and what efforts are needed to solve it.

GUESTS: Jenny Nagaoka, co-author on UChicago “Four Years Fallacy” study and deputy director of UChicago Consortium on School Research

Alex Usher, co-author on UChicago “Four Years Fallacy” study and associate director of The To&Through Project at The University of Chicago

Brian Harris, director of college pathways for Chicago Public Schools