On Holocaust Remembrance Day, Warnings Of ‘Inaction’ Against Racism

“Words matter,” Illinois Holocaust Museum’s Susan Abrams told Reset. “The Holocaust didn’t start with gas chambers. It started with words.”

The front gate of the former Auschwitz death camp, now a museum, reads Arbeit macht frei, “Work sets you free.” More than 2 million people visit the Auschwitz museum each year.
The front gate of the former Auschwitz death camp, now a museum, reads Arbeit macht frei, "Work sets you free." More than 2 million people visit the Auschwitz museum each year.
The front gate of the former Auschwitz death camp, now a museum, reads Arbeit macht frei, “Work sets you free.” More than 2 million people visit the Auschwitz museum each year.
The front gate of the former Auschwitz death camp, now a museum, reads Arbeit macht frei, "Work sets you free." More than 2 million people visit the Auschwitz museum each year.

On Holocaust Remembrance Day, Warnings Of ‘Inaction’ Against Racism

“Words matter,” Illinois Holocaust Museum’s Susan Abrams told Reset. “The Holocaust didn’t start with gas chambers. It started with words.”

Wednesday marks Holocaust Remembrance Day, which comes just three weeks after a Trump supporter infamously wore a “Camp Auschwitz” sweatshirt at the siege on the U.S. Capitol building.

As anti-Semitism is reportedly on the rise in the country, Reset talks to the Illinois Holocaust Museum about how they’re marking this day.

GUEST: Susan Abrams, CEO of the Illinois Holocaust Museum