Re-Imagine Chicago: Why Aldermen Work More Like ‘Mini-Mayors’

Reset teams up with the University of Chicago’s Center for Effective Government to explore new ways the city could work for its residents.

Re-Imagine Chicago: Why Aldermen Work More Like ‘Mini-Mayors’ (Part 2)
Members of the the Chicago City Council convene at City Hall, Wednesday morning, April 21, 2021. That Wednesday marked the first in-person council meeting since the start of the coronavirus pandemic more than a year ago. Ashlee Rezin Garcia / Chicago Sun-Times via AP, Pool
Re-Imagine Chicago: Why Aldermen Work More Like ‘Mini-Mayors’ (Part 2)
Members of the the Chicago City Council convene at City Hall, Wednesday morning, April 21, 2021. That Wednesday marked the first in-person council meeting since the start of the coronavirus pandemic more than a year ago. Ashlee Rezin Garcia / Chicago Sun-Times via AP, Pool

Re-Imagine Chicago: Why Aldermen Work More Like ‘Mini-Mayors’

Reset teams up with the University of Chicago’s Center for Effective Government to explore new ways the city could work for its residents.

Chicago aldermen operate more like ward bosses than true legislators. For the second installment of our “Re-Imagine Chicago” series, Reset explores the history of Chicago’s aldermanic system and how it impacts individual residents and the city’s ability to get things done.

GUESTS: Julius L. Jones, assistant curator at the Chicago History Museum

Ald. Jeanette Taylor, 20th Ward

Ald. Michael Rodriguez, 22nd Ward

Robert, Washington Heights resident

Barbara Stewart, North Lawndale resident