Scottish High Court Challenges UK Parliament Suspension

Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson speaks to apprentices as he visits the NLV Pharos, a lighthouse tender moored on the river Thames, to mark London International Shipping Week in London, Thursday, Sept. 12, 2019. The British government insisted Thursday that its forecast of food and medicine shortages, gridlock at ports and riots in the streets after a no-deal Brexit is an avoidable worst-case scenario, as Prime Minister Boris Johnson denied misleading Queen Elizabeth II about his reasons for suspending Parliament just weeks before the country is due to leave the European Union.
Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson speaks to apprentices as he visits the NLV Pharos, a lighthouse tender moored on the river Thames, to mark London International Shipping Week in London, Thursday, Sept. 12, 2019. The British government insisted Thursday that its forecast of food and medicine shortages, gridlock at ports and riots in the streets after a no-deal Brexit is an avoidable worst-case scenario, as Prime Minister Boris Johnson denied misleading Queen Elizabeth II about his reasons for suspending Parliament just weeks before the country is due to leave the European Union. Daniel Leal-Olivas / AP
Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson speaks to apprentices as he visits the NLV Pharos, a lighthouse tender moored on the river Thames, to mark London International Shipping Week in London, Thursday, Sept. 12, 2019. The British government insisted Thursday that its forecast of food and medicine shortages, gridlock at ports and riots in the streets after a no-deal Brexit is an avoidable worst-case scenario, as Prime Minister Boris Johnson denied misleading Queen Elizabeth II about his reasons for suspending Parliament just weeks before the country is due to leave the European Union.
Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson speaks to apprentices as he visits the NLV Pharos, a lighthouse tender moored on the river Thames, to mark London International Shipping Week in London, Thursday, Sept. 12, 2019. The British government insisted Thursday that its forecast of food and medicine shortages, gridlock at ports and riots in the streets after a no-deal Brexit is an avoidable worst-case scenario, as Prime Minister Boris Johnson denied misleading Queen Elizabeth II about his reasons for suspending Parliament just weeks before the country is due to leave the European Union. Daniel Leal-Olivas / AP

Scottish High Court Challenges UK Parliament Suspension

The United Kingdom's Parliament denied Prime Minister Boris Johnson a snap general election and forced him to forego a "No-Deal" option for Brexit before it was suspended for five weeks on Tuesday. The Scottish and English high courts then came to differing opinions on whether Johnson's decision to suspend Parliament was constitutional, with the Scottish court arguing that it was a deliberate attempt to "stymie Parliament." We'll talk about what lies ahead for the Brexit process and the United Kingdom's government with Adam Roberts, chief Midwest correspondenet for The Economist.