The Alt-Right Movement’s Origins And Axioms

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks in Des Moines, Iowa. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton recently called out Donald Trump and his advisers for embracing a “disturbing alt-right” political philosophy that her campaign says presents “a divisive and dystopian view of America.”
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks in Des Moines, Iowa. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton recently called out Donald Trump and his advisers for embracing a “disturbing alt-right” political philosophy that her campaign says presents “a divisive and dystopian view of America.” Gerald Herbert / AP Photo
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks in Des Moines, Iowa. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton recently called out Donald Trump and his advisers for embracing a “disturbing alt-right” political philosophy that her campaign says presents “a divisive and dystopian view of America.”
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks in Des Moines, Iowa. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton recently called out Donald Trump and his advisers for embracing a “disturbing alt-right” political philosophy that her campaign says presents “a divisive and dystopian view of America.” Gerald Herbert / AP Photo

The Alt-Right Movement’s Origins And Axioms

There’s alt-rock, alt-country…but alt-right? The political term, short for Alternative Right, has blown up so much in the past few days that even Hillary Clinton used it during her speech last Thursday to criticize opponent Donald Trump.

But what is the alternative right, and how is it different from everyday conservatism?

Morning Shift talks with Buzzfeed News reporter Rosie Gray about the alt-right movement and its growing influence in the 2016 presidential race.