The Alt-Right, White Nationalists, And White Supremacy

In this Saturday, April 23, 2016 photo, members of the Ku Klux Klan participate in a “white pride” rally in Rome, Ga. Klan leaders say they feel that U.S. politics are going their way, as a nationalist, us-against-them mentality deepens across the nation. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
In this Saturday, April 23, 2016 photo, members of the Ku Klux Klan participate in a "white pride" rally in Rome, Ga. Klan leaders say they feel that U.S. politics are going their way, as a nationalist, us-against-them mentality deepens across the nation. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
In this Saturday, April 23, 2016 photo, members of the Ku Klux Klan participate in a “white pride” rally in Rome, Ga. Klan leaders say they feel that U.S. politics are going their way, as a nationalist, us-against-them mentality deepens across the nation. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
In this Saturday, April 23, 2016 photo, members of the Ku Klux Klan participate in a "white pride" rally in Rome, Ga. Klan leaders say they feel that U.S. politics are going their way, as a nationalist, us-against-them mentality deepens across the nation. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)

The Alt-Right, White Nationalists, And White Supremacy

During the election season, a phrase popped up that you might not have heard previously: “white nationalists.” And as Donald Trump chooses his Cabinet appointees, some—particularly Steve Bannon and Jeff Sessions—are being connected with the white nationalist movement.

But what are white nationalists exactly? How is it different from white supremacy? Is it part of the alt-right? And why do they feel Trump’s victory gives their movement a jolt and a potential seat at the table? Morning Shift talks to Washington Post political reporter David Weigel to break down what are white nationalists and what they want from a Trump administration.