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Filipino nurses

New Filipino nurses place their hands on their chests during an oath-taking ceremony for new professional nurses at a 2010 convention in the Philippines.

Bullit Marquez

Filipino nurses

New Filipino nurses place their hands on their chests during an oath-taking ceremony for new professional nurses at a 2010 convention in the Philippines.

Bullit Marquez

The history of Filipino nurses in the U.S.

Filipinos make up the majority of foreign-trained registered nurses here in the U.S. and Filipino Americans continue this legacy today.

New Filipino nurses place their hands on their chests during an oath-taking ceremony for new professional nurses at a 2010 convention in the Philippines.

Bullit Marquez

   

About one in 20 registered nurses in the U.S. are Filipinos. And nursing is more than just an occupational niche for them. The history of Filipino nurses goes back to the U.S. colonizing the country in 1898.

Reset learns more about the history of nursing in the Philippines and the migration of Philippines-trained nurses to America.

GUESTS: Catherine Ceniza Choy, professor of ethnic studies at the University of California Berkeley, author of “Empire of Care: Nursing and Migration in Filipino American History” and “Asian American Histories of the United States”

Leo-Felix Jurado, professor and founding dean of the College of Health Professions at the Commonwealth University of Pennsylvania, executive director of the Philippine Nurses Association of America

Bryan Ranchero, retired registered nurse from Cook County Public Health

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