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The Rundown Podcast - PM Show Tile

Stay in the loop with the Windy City’s biggest news.

The Rundown Podcast - PM Show Tile

Stay in the loop with the Windy City’s biggest news.

Through film, Adam L. McMath preserves community history

Years ago, Adam L. McMath was nervously debuting a documentary at the Black Alphabet Film Festival, which bills itself as Chicago’s first Black LGBTQ+ film festival. His film was called “Misunderstud,” about 10 masculine lesbians, and he said he and his producers got a standing ovation when the credits rolled. Today, McMath is the executive director at Black Alphabet, and his goal is to uplift the next generation of storytellers. “Now is the time to be a storyteller,” McMath said. “I want to uplift young folks that don’t think they can do it, and let them know that you actually can. It’s hard work, but it’s easier than you think to get into.” In this episode, McMath explains when he first felt the power of film, how Chicago has influenced his work, and why he wants to keep telling the history of Black LGBTQ+ Chicagoans. This episode was produced by Ari Mejia for WBEZ’s sister station Vocalo and their Chi Sounds Like series.

Stay in the loop with the Windy City’s biggest news.

 

Years ago, Adam L. McMath was nervously debuting a documentary at the Black Alphabet Film Festival, which bills itself as Chicago’s first Black LGBTQ+ film festival. His film was called “Misunderstud,” about 10 masculine lesbians, and he said he and his producers got a standing ovation when the credits rolled. 

Today, McMath is the executive director at Black Alphabet, and his goal is to uplift the next generation of storytellers.

“Now is the time to be a storyteller,” McMath said. “I want to uplift young folks that don’t think they can do it, and let them know that you actually can. It’s hard work, but it’s easier than you think to get into.” 

In this episode, McMath explains when he first felt the power of film, how Chicago has influenced his work, and why he wants to keep telling the history of Black LGBTQ+ Chicagoans. 

This episode was produced by Ari Mejia for WBEZ’s sister station Vocalo and their Chi Sounds Like series.

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