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Bradley Campbell

The Soulbury Stone has rested in the middle of a road in the small town of Soulbury, England for 11,000 years. And if residents have their way, it will sit there for eternity.
World Champion Peter Sagan infuriated the cycling world. He showed up to a race with hairy legs.
Kenyan runners are some of the best in the world. And Nike may have bribed Kenyan running officials into keeping the swoosh on the feet of the Kenyan national team.
Zika virus is a distant relative to yellow fever. It’s native to Uganda and was mostly considered harmless. That is, until it came to Brazil, where it’s being blamed for babies being born with unusually small brains. And now, paralysis.
Zika virus is a distant relative to yellow fever. It’s native to Uganda and was mostly considered harmless. That is, until it came to Brazil, where it’s being blamed for babies being born with unusually small brains. And now, paralysis.
There’s a new young adult novel out. It hopes to inspire young girls toward acts of defiance. It’s called, “The Green Bicycle.” And here’s hoping it works, especially in Saudi Arabia.
The nation’s Communist Party members — all 88 million of them — are now officially barred from belonging to a golf club. The ban is part of President Xi Jinping’s drive to root out extravagance and corruption.
The ultimate stash of terrorist mix-tapes were found in Afghanistan. More than a decade later, Flagg Miller has produced a coherent narrative of what they all mean.
Every year, the US State Department releases an annual report on the state of religious freedom around the world. The latest one is pretty grim. But what about the US? What’s our status?
Transit maps fight climate change. Or at least, they might.
Playboy is synonymous with nudity. But in China, it’s synonymous with bath soap.
Two massive global beer behemoths with deep ties to the US but international addresses are considering a merger that would upend the corporate beer market.
Haruki Murakami, the perennial favorite to win the Nobel Prize for Literature, says his desire to write is all due to a double hit by an American baseball player named Dave Hilton. Really? We tracked down that player, and an expert on creativity to see if the story is truth, or fiction.