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Meet The Everyday Crypto Investors Caught Up In The FTX Implosion

MIAMI, FLORIDA - NOVEMBER 18: In an aerial view, the FTX Arena, which the Miami Heat call home on November 18, 2022 in Miami, Florida. Fallout continues after the cryptocurrency firm FTX filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. Miami-Dade County and the Miami Heat are ending their arena naming rights deal with the company. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Meet The Everyday Crypto Investors Caught Up In The FTX Implosion

MIAMI, FLORIDA - NOVEMBER 18: In an aerial view, the FTX Arena, which the Miami Heat call home on November 18, 2022 in Miami, Florida. Fallout continues after the cryptocurrency firm FTX filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. Miami-Dade County and the Miami Heat are ending their arena naming rights deal with the company. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Meet The Everyday Crypto Investors Caught Up In The FTX Implosion

Jake Thacker of Portland, Ore. says he had $70,000 trapped in FTX when the the cryptocurrency exchange collapsed this month. That money may be gone. And he's not the only one. The company's bankruptcy filing says it could owe money to more than a million people. NPR's Chris Arnold reports on how the FTX implosion is affecting everyday investors. And NPR's David Gura looks at whether it could spur Congress to pass new regulations on the crypto industry. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

MIAMI, FLORIDA - NOVEMBER 18: In an aerial view, the FTX Arena, which the Miami Heat call home on November 18, 2022 in Miami, Florida. Fallout continues after the cryptocurrency firm FTX filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. Miami-Dade County and the Miami Heat are ending their arena naming rights deal with the company. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Joe Raedle/Getty Images

 

Jake Thacker of Portland, Ore. says he had $70,000 trapped in FTX when the the cryptocurrency exchange collapsed this month. That money may be gone.

And he's not the only one. The company's bankruptcy filing says it could owe money to more than a million people.

NPR's Chris Arnold reports on how the FTX implosion is affecting everyday investors.

And NPR's David Gura looks at whether it could spur Congress to pass new regulations on the crypto industry.

In participating regions, you’ll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what’s going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

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