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Amid Missile Tests, What Is North Korea's Endgame?

People sit near a television showing a news broadcast with a file photo of a North Korean intercontinental ballistic missile on display during a military parade, at a railway station in Seoul on November 18, 2022. - A suspected intercontinental ballistic missile launched by North Korea on Friday is believed to have fallen in Japan’s exclusive economic waters, Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida said. (Photo by Anthony WALLACE / AFP) (Photo by ANTHONY WALLACE/AFP via Getty Images)

ANTHONY WALLACE/AFP via Getty Images

Amid Missile Tests, What Is North Korea's Endgame?

People sit near a television showing a news broadcast with a file photo of a North Korean intercontinental ballistic missile on display during a military parade, at a railway station in Seoul on November 18, 2022. - A suspected intercontinental ballistic missile launched by North Korea on Friday is believed to have fallen in Japan’s exclusive economic waters, Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida said. (Photo by Anthony WALLACE / AFP) (Photo by ANTHONY WALLACE/AFP via Getty Images)

ANTHONY WALLACE/AFP via Getty Images

Amid Missile Tests, What Is North Korea's Endgame?

North Korea says it has successfully tested its largest intercontinental ballistic missile. And experts say it could potentially deliver a nuclear warhead to targets in the continental United States. But what is North Korea's ultimate goal? And how can the United States and its allies deter Pyongyang? Mary Louise Kelly discusses that with NPR correspondent Anthony Kuhn and Victor Cha of the Center for Strategic and International Studies. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

People sit near a television showing a news broadcast with a file photo of a North Korean intercontinental ballistic missile on display during a military parade, at a railway station in Seoul on November 18, 2022. - A suspected intercontinental ballistic missile launched by North Korea on Friday is believed to have fallen in Japan’s exclusive economic waters, Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida said. (Photo by Anthony WALLACE / AFP) (Photo by ANTHONY WALLACE/AFP via Getty Images)

ANTHONY WALLACE/AFP via Getty Images

 

North Korea says it has successfully tested its largest intercontinental ballistic missile. And experts say it could potentially deliver a nuclear warhead to targets in the continental United States.

But what is North Korea's ultimate goal? And how can the United States and its allies deter Pyongyang? Mary Louise Kelly discusses that with NPR correspondent Anthony Kuhn and Victor Cha of the Center for Strategic and International Studies.
In participating regions, you’ll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what’s going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

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