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A Ukrainian City Marks A Year Of Loss—And Resistance

Candles are lit in front of the national flags of Ukraine, each dedicated to a serviceman killed during the Russian invasion of Ukraine, marking the first anniversary of the war, in Kyiv on February 24, 2023. (Photo by Dimitar DILKOFF / AFP) (Photo by DIMITAR DILKOFF/AFP via Getty Images)

DIMITAR DILKOFF/AFP via Getty Images

A Ukrainian City Marks A Year Of Loss—And Resistance

Candles are lit in front of the national flags of Ukraine, each dedicated to a serviceman killed during the Russian invasion of Ukraine, marking the first anniversary of the war, in Kyiv on February 24, 2023. (Photo by Dimitar DILKOFF / AFP) (Photo by DIMITAR DILKOFF/AFP via Getty Images)

DIMITAR DILKOFF/AFP via Getty Images

A Ukrainian City Marks A Year Of Loss—And Resistance

Kherson was the the first major Ukrainian city to fall to Russian troops. With deep historical ties to Russia, it was not expected to be a center of resistance. But an army of citizen spies defied Moscow's expectations, and helped Ukrainian forces liberate the city last November. A year after Russia launched its invasion, NPR's Joanna Kakissis has the story of Kherson's partisans: teachers and accountants and landscape designers, who became eyes and ears for the Ukrainian military. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

Candles are lit in front of the national flags of Ukraine, each dedicated to a serviceman killed during the Russian invasion of Ukraine, marking the first anniversary of the war, in Kyiv on February 24, 2023. (Photo by Dimitar DILKOFF / AFP) (Photo by DIMITAR DILKOFF/AFP via Getty Images)

DIMITAR DILKOFF/AFP via Getty Images

 

Kherson was the the first major Ukrainian city to fall to Russian troops. With deep historical ties to Russia, it was not expected to be a center of resistance.

But an army of citizen spies defied Moscow's expectations, and helped Ukrainian forces liberate the city last November.

A year after Russia launched its invasion, NPR's Joanna Kakissis has the story of Kherson's partisans: teachers and accountants and landscape designers, who became eyes and ears for the Ukrainian military.

In participating regions, you’ll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what’s going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

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