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Love, Loss And Resilience - Stories From A Kindergarten Class In Ukraine
Love, Loss And Resilience - Stories From A Kindergarten Class In Ukraine

Love, Loss And Resilience - Stories From A Kindergarten Class In Ukraine

Millions of children have left Ukraine since the Russian invasion. They have relocated across the country and the globe. And while these children are survivors, for many the emotional scars are difficult to heal. A team of NPR journalists spent months following the stories of 27 kindergarten students - 6-year-olds - who were forced to leave their homes and school in the northeast city of Kharkiv in Ukraine when Russian troops invaded. Two of the children, Aurora and Daniel, were best friends. Always together in class - inseparable – until they were forced apart by war. Daniel and his family fled to New York. Aurora and her parents ended up in Spain. Host Elissa Nadworny speaks with the children and their parents about how they are learning to live without each other in a world where they have already lost so much. And a psychologist discusses the strength and resilience of kids in the face of trauma.

 

Millions of children have left Ukraine since the Russian invasion. They have relocated across the country and the globe. And while these children are survivors, for many the emotional scars are difficult to heal.

A team of NPR journalists spent months following the stories of 27 kindergarten students - 6-year-olds - who were forced to leave their homes and school in the northeast city of Kharkiv in Ukraine when Russian troops invaded.

Two of the children, Aurora and Daniel, were best friends. Always together in class - inseparable – until they were forced apart by war. Daniel and his family fled to New York. Aurora and her parents ended up in Spain.

Host Elissa Nadworny speaks with the children and their parents about how they are learning to live without each other in a world where they have already lost so much.

And a psychologist discusses the strength and resilience of kids in the face of trauma.

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