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Despite Layoffs, There Are Still Lots Of Jobs Out There. So Where Are They?

Pedestrians walk by a “Now Hiring” sign outside a store on August 16, 2021 in Arlington, Virginia. (Photo by Olivier DOULIERY / AFP) (Photo by OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP via Getty Images)

OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP via Getty Images

Despite Layoffs, There Are Still Lots Of Jobs Out There. So Where Are They?

Pedestrians walk by a “Now Hiring” sign outside a store on August 16, 2021 in Arlington, Virginia. (Photo by Olivier DOULIERY / AFP) (Photo by OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP via Getty Images)

OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP via Getty Images

Despite Layoffs, There Are Still Lots Of Jobs Out There. So Where Are They?

Even amid mass layoffs in tech and other sectors, the economy is still adding jobs. Even tech jobs. NPR's Andrea Hsu reports on a program that recruits and trains workers to enter the tech pipeline. And NPR's Juana Summers speaks with Dana Peterson, chief economist with the Conference Board, about some of the broader trends in the labor market and what they could mean for job seekers. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

Pedestrians walk by a “Now Hiring” sign outside a store on August 16, 2021 in Arlington, Virginia. (Photo by Olivier DOULIERY / AFP) (Photo by OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP via Getty Images)

OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP via Getty Images

 

Even amid mass layoffs in tech and other sectors, the economy is still adding jobs. Even tech jobs.

NPR's Andrea Hsu reports on a program that recruits and trains workers to enter the tech pipeline.

And NPR's Juana Summers speaks with Dana Peterson, chief economist with the Conference Board, about some of the broader trends in the labor market and what they could mean for job seekers.

In participating regions, you’ll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what’s going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

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