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Breaking Down The Conflict in Sudan

A man walks by a house hit in recent fighting in Khartoum, Sudan, Tuesday, April 25, 2023. Sudan’s warring generals have pledged to observe a new three-day truce that was brokered by the United States and Saudi Arabia to try to pull Africa’s third-largest nation from the abyss. (AP Photo/Marwan Ali)

Marwan Ali/AP

Breaking Down The Conflict in Sudan

A man walks by a house hit in recent fighting in Khartoum, Sudan, Tuesday, April 25, 2023. Sudan’s warring generals have pledged to observe a new three-day truce that was brokered by the United States and Saudi Arabia to try to pull Africa’s third-largest nation from the abyss. (AP Photo/Marwan Ali)

Marwan Ali/AP

Breaking Down The Conflict in Sudan

Sudan's month-long conflict has been a story of broken ceasefires, constant clashes, mass displacement and an exodus of refugees. Now, a conflict that started in the capital has spread across the country. At the center of this conflict is a bitter rivalry between two generals. General Abdel Fattah al-Burhan, the leader of the country's military, and his former deputy, Mohamed Hamdan Dagalo, head of the paramilitary Rapid Support Forces (RSF). Sudan is Africa's third largest country, it shares a border with seven other countries in an already volatile region. The longer the conflict drags on, the greater the risk that it could erupt into a civil war - and the greater the danger that the conflict could spill over into surrounding countries. NPR's Asma Khalid speaks with Africa correspondent Emanuel Akinwotu, Middle East correspondent Aya Batrawy, and Michele Kelemen who covers the U.S. State Department. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

A man walks by a house hit in recent fighting in Khartoum, Sudan, Tuesday, April 25, 2023. Sudan’s warring generals have pledged to observe a new three-day truce that was brokered by the United States and Saudi Arabia to try to pull Africa’s third-largest nation from the abyss. (AP Photo/Marwan Ali)

Marwan Ali/AP

 

Sudan's month-long conflict has been a story of broken ceasefires, constant clashes, mass displacement and an exodus of refugees.

Now, a conflict that started in the capital has spread across the country. At the center of this conflict is a bitter rivalry between two generals. General Abdel Fattah al-Burhan, the leader of the country's military, and his former deputy, Mohamed Hamdan Dagalo, head of the paramilitary Rapid Support Forces (RSF).

Sudan is Africa's third largest country, it shares a border with seven other countries in an already volatile region. The longer the conflict drags on, the greater the risk that it could erupt into a civil war - and the greater the danger that the conflict could spill over into surrounding countries.

NPR's Asma Khalid speaks with Africa correspondent Emanuel Akinwotu, Middle East correspondent Aya Batrawy, and Michele Kelemen who covers the U.S. State Department.

In participating regions, you’ll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what’s going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

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