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For Russia and Ukraine, The Battlefield Includes The Economy

A Russian ruble coin is pictured in front of the Kremlin in central Moscow, on April 28, 2022. - A Russian official said Thursday that the ruble will soon be introduced in areas of Ukraine under Moscow’s control, despite Russia earlier insisting it was not seeking to occupy captured territory. A civilian and military administrator of the Russian-controlled region of Kherson in southern Ukraine said Moscow would introduce its currency in the region within the coming days. (Photo by Alexander NEMENOV / AFP) (Photo by ALEXANDER NEMENOV/AFP via Getty Images)

ALEXANDER NEMENOV/AFP via Getty Images

For Russia and Ukraine, The Battlefield Includes The Economy

A Russian ruble coin is pictured in front of the Kremlin in central Moscow, on April 28, 2022. - A Russian official said Thursday that the ruble will soon be introduced in areas of Ukraine under Moscow’s control, despite Russia earlier insisting it was not seeking to occupy captured territory. A civilian and military administrator of the Russian-controlled region of Kherson in southern Ukraine said Moscow would introduce its currency in the region within the coming days. (Photo by Alexander NEMENOV / AFP) (Photo by ALEXANDER NEMENOV/AFP via Getty Images)

ALEXANDER NEMENOV/AFP via Getty Images

For Russia and Ukraine, The Battlefield Includes The Economy

Wars are expensive. And Russia's invasion of Ukraine has had an impact on the economies of both countries. NPR's Julian Hayda, in Kyiv, reports that international assistance is allowing Ukraine to stabilize its economy and avoid collapse. The Russian economy seems to have remained resilient in the face of sanctions and other trade and financial restrictions. But NPR's Stacey Vanek Smith reports on how that could be changing. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

A Russian ruble coin is pictured in front of the Kremlin in central Moscow, on April 28, 2022. - A Russian official said Thursday that the ruble will soon be introduced in areas of Ukraine under Moscow’s control, despite Russia earlier insisting it was not seeking to occupy captured territory. A civilian and military administrator of the Russian-controlled region of Kherson in southern Ukraine said Moscow would introduce its currency in the region within the coming days. (Photo by Alexander NEMENOV / AFP) (Photo by ALEXANDER NEMENOV/AFP via Getty Images)

ALEXANDER NEMENOV/AFP via Getty Images

 

Wars are expensive. And Russia's invasion of Ukraine has had an impact on the economies of both countries.

NPR's Julian Hayda, in Kyiv, reports that international assistance is allowing Ukraine to stabilize its economy and avoid collapse.

The Russian economy seems to have remained resilient in the face of sanctions and other trade and financial restrictions. But NPR's Stacey Vanek Smith reports on how that could be changing.

In participating regions, you’ll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what’s going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

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