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What It's Like Inside The Submersible That's Lost In The Atlantic

A member of the Coast Guard walks by a Coast Guard Cutter at the US Coast Guard Base Boston in Boston, Massachusetts on June 20, 2023. The Titan submersible with five people on board has “about 40 hours of breathable air” left, Frederick said Tuesday. (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo by JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP via Getty Images)

JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP via Getty Images

What It's Like Inside The Submersible That's Lost In The Atlantic

A member of the Coast Guard walks by a Coast Guard Cutter at the US Coast Guard Base Boston in Boston, Massachusetts on June 20, 2023. The Titan submersible with five people on board has “about 40 hours of breathable air” left, Frederick said Tuesday. (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo by JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP via Getty Images)

JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP via Getty Images

What It's Like Inside The Submersible That's Lost In The Atlantic

Time is running out to locate the submersible vessel that went missing Sunday, on a voyage to visit the wreckage of the Titanic. The U.S. Coast Guard estimates the five people aboard the vessel, known as the Titan, could run out of air by Thursday morning. CBS Sunday Morning correspondent David Pogue was aboard the same vessel to take the same voyage last year. He says its interior is the size of a minivan, it's built with a combination of off-the-rack and highly technical components and it has a hatch that's bolted shut from the outside. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

A member of the Coast Guard walks by a Coast Guard Cutter at the US Coast Guard Base Boston in Boston, Massachusetts on June 20, 2023. The Titan submersible with five people on board has “about 40 hours of breathable air” left, Frederick said Tuesday. (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo by JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP via Getty Images)

JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP via Getty Images

 

Time is running out to locate the submersible vessel that went missing Sunday, on a voyage to visit the wreckage of the Titanic. The U.S. Coast Guard estimates the five people aboard the vessel, known as the Titan, could run out of air by Thursday morning.

CBS Sunday Morning correspondent David Pogue was aboard the same vessel to take the same voyage last year. He says its interior is the size of a minivan, it's built with a combination of off-the-rack and highly technical components and it has a hatch that's bolted shut from the outside.

In participating regions, you’ll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what’s going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

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