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Are We Witnessing The Death Of Movie Stars?

The classic film Casablanca marks its 75th birthday this year. One little known fact? Humphrey Bogart was shorter than Ingrid Bergman, so he had to stand on a box during filming

Warner Bros./AP

Are We Witnessing The Death Of Movie Stars?

The classic film Casablanca marks its 75th birthday this year. One little known fact? Humphrey Bogart was shorter than Ingrid Bergman, so he had to stand on a box during filming

Warner Bros./AP

Are We Witnessing The Death Of Movie Stars?

Humphrey Bogart, Cary Grant, Bettie Davis, Clark Gable. During Hollywood's Golden Age, which existed roughly from the 1910s and 20's into the early 1960s, these actors weren't just stars... They were in the words of NPR's movie critic Bob Mondello "American royalty". But in an age of Disney and Marvel, the movie star appears to have been eclipsed by the franchises in which they appear. NPR critics Mondello and Aisha Harris breakdown the decline and seemingly disappearance of the classic movie star and what that means for Hollywood. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

The classic film Casablanca marks its 75th birthday this year. One little known fact? Humphrey Bogart was shorter than Ingrid Bergman, so he had to stand on a box during filming

Warner Bros./AP

 

Humphrey Bogart, Cary Grant, Bettie Davis, Clark Gable. During Hollywood's Golden Age, which existed roughly from the 1910s and 20's into the early 1960s, these actors weren't just stars...

They were in the words of NPR's movie critic Bob Mondello "American royalty".

But in an age of Disney and Marvel, the movie star appears to have been eclipsed by the franchises in which they appear.

NPR critics Mondello and Aisha Harris breakdown the decline and seemingly disappearance of the classic movie star and what that means for Hollywood.

In participating regions, you’ll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what’s going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

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