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New Research Could Change the Landscape of Human Reproduction

Conception CSO Pablo Hurtado shows very early primitive germ cells under a microscope while giving a tour of the lab at the office of Conception in Berkeley, Calif., on Tuesday, June 6, 2023. Conception is generating induced pluripotent stem cells from blood samples and is working on creating viable human eggs from these, with the goal of it being a reproductive treatment.

Laura Morton/Freelance for NPR

New Research Could Change the Landscape of Human Reproduction

Conception CSO Pablo Hurtado shows very early primitive germ cells under a microscope while giving a tour of the lab at the office of Conception in Berkeley, Calif., on Tuesday, June 6, 2023. Conception is generating induced pluripotent stem cells from blood samples and is working on creating viable human eggs from these, with the goal of it being a reproductive treatment.

Laura Morton/Freelance for NPR

New Research Could Change the Landscape of Human Reproduction

One of the most cutting-edge and controversial fields of biomedical research right now is the quest to create eggs and sperm in the lab for anyone with their own DNA. And now, private companies have jumped into the race to revolutionize the way humans reproduce. In vitro gametogenesis, or IVG, would enable infertile women and men to have children with their own DNA instead of genes from the sperm and eggs of donors. It would also provide queer couples the opportunity to have children biologically related to both partners. NPR health correspondent Rob Stein reports on the excitement and concerns this new technology has fueled. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

Conception CSO Pablo Hurtado shows very early primitive germ cells under a microscope while giving a tour of the lab at the office of Conception in Berkeley, Calif., on Tuesday, June 6, 2023. Conception is generating induced pluripotent stem cells from blood samples and is working on creating viable human eggs from these, with the goal of it being a reproductive treatment.

Laura Morton/Freelance for NPR

 

One of the most cutting-edge and controversial fields of biomedical research right now is the quest to create eggs and sperm in the lab for anyone with their own DNA. And now, private companies have jumped into the race to revolutionize the way humans reproduce.

In vitro gametogenesis, or IVG, would enable infertile women and men to have children with their own DNA instead of genes from the sperm and eggs of donors. It would also provide queer couples the opportunity to have children biologically related to both partners.

NPR health correspondent Rob Stein reports on the excitement and concerns this new technology has fueled.

In participating regions, you’ll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what’s going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

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