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Three Stories From A Very Hot July

PHOENIX, ARIZONA - JULY 25: A sign reading ‘Today’s High: 115' is posted in South Mountain Park amid the city’s worst heat wave on record on July 25, 2023 in Phoenix, Arizona. While Phoenix endures periods of extreme heat every year, today marked the 26th straight day of temperatures reaching 110 degrees or higher, a new record amid a long duration heat wave in the Southwest. Extreme heat kills more people than hurricanes, floods and tornadoes combined in an average year in the U.S. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Mario Tama/Getty Images

Three Stories From A Very Hot July

PHOENIX, ARIZONA - JULY 25: A sign reading ‘Today’s High: 115' is posted in South Mountain Park amid the city’s worst heat wave on record on July 25, 2023 in Phoenix, Arizona. While Phoenix endures periods of extreme heat every year, today marked the 26th straight day of temperatures reaching 110 degrees or higher, a new record amid a long duration heat wave in the Southwest. Extreme heat kills more people than hurricanes, floods and tornadoes combined in an average year in the U.S. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Mario Tama/Getty Images

Three Stories From A Very Hot July

July was almost certainly the hottest month, globally, on record. It was also a month in which many lives were upended by weather related-disasters — the sort of disasters that are increasingly likely as climate change continues. So what do the people who lived through those disasters make of all this? We asked Dr. Frank LoVecchio, an emergency room doctor at Valleywise Health Medical Center in Phoenix, Ariz., about trying to keep people alive who spent too much time out in the deadly heat. And Michelle Eddleman McCormick, general manager at the Marshfield Village Store in Vermont, about living through extreme flooding. And Will Nicholls, of the Cree Nation of Mistissini, editor-in-chief of The Nation magazine, about how historic wildfires in northern Quebec have affected his community. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

PHOENIX, ARIZONA - JULY 25: A sign reading ‘Today’s High: 115' is posted in South Mountain Park amid the city’s worst heat wave on record on July 25, 2023 in Phoenix, Arizona. While Phoenix endures periods of extreme heat every year, today marked the 26th straight day of temperatures reaching 110 degrees or higher, a new record amid a long duration heat wave in the Southwest. Extreme heat kills more people than hurricanes, floods and tornadoes combined in an average year in the U.S. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Mario Tama/Getty Images

 

July was almost certainly the hottest month, globally, on record. It was also a month in which many lives were upended by weather related-disasters — the sort of disasters that are increasingly likely as climate change continues.

So what do the people who lived through those disasters make of all this?

We asked Dr. Frank LoVecchio, an emergency room doctor at Valleywise Health Medical Center in Phoenix, Ariz., about trying to keep people alive who spent too much time out in the deadly heat.

And Michelle Eddleman McCormick, general manager at the Marshfield Village Store in Vermont, about living through extreme flooding.

And Will Nicholls, of the Cree Nation of Mistissini, editor-in-chief of The Nation magazine, about how historic wildfires in northern Quebec have affected his community.

In participating regions, you’ll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what’s going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

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