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How Important Are Biden And Trump's Ages? We Asked Older Voters.

David Reckless tinkers with a ferris wheel in the Train Room at Passavant Community Abundant Life Center in Zelienople, Pa., on Sept. 21, 2023.

Nate Smallwood/Nate Smallwood

How Important Are Biden And Trump's Ages? We Asked Older Voters.

David Reckless tinkers with a ferris wheel in the Train Room at Passavant Community Abundant Life Center in Zelienople, Pa., on Sept. 21, 2023.

Nate Smallwood/Nate Smallwood

How Important Are Biden And Trump's Ages? We Asked Older Voters.

As president Joe Biden's campaign for a second term gets underway, a slew of recent polls show that voters have concerns about his age. At the end of a second term, he would be 86 years old. The Republican frontrunner, former president Donald Trump, is just a few years younger. We wanted to check in with some voters who have first-hand experience with aging: seniors. So we headed to Pittsburgh and the surrounding suburbs, a pivotal region in a pivotal state in the 2024 race, and spoke with older voters how they're thinking about age in this election. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

David Reckless tinkers with a ferris wheel in the Train Room at Passavant Community Abundant Life Center in Zelienople, Pa., on Sept. 21, 2023.

Nate Smallwood/Nate Smallwood

 

As president Joe Biden's campaign for a second term gets underway, a slew of recent polls show that voters have concerns about his age. At the end of a second term, he would be 86 years old. The Republican frontrunner, former president Donald Trump, is just a few years younger.

We wanted to check in with some voters who have first-hand experience with aging: seniors. So we headed to Pittsburgh and the surrounding suburbs, a pivotal region in a pivotal state in the 2024 race, and spoke with older voters how they're thinking about age in this election.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

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