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Violence in Iran and Lebanon Prompts Concern Israel-Hamas War Could Expand

Iranian emergency services arrive at the site where two explosions in quick succession struck a crowd marking the anniversary of the 2020 killing of Guards general Qasem Soleimani, near the Saheb al-Zaman Mosque in the southern Iranian city of Kerman on January 3, 2024. The blasts, which state television called a “terrorist attack”, came with tensions running high in the Middle East a day after Hamas number two was killed in a Beirut drone strike. The blasts stuck near the Saheb al-Zaman Mosque in Kerman, Soleimani’s southern hometown where he is buried, as supporters gathered to mark the fourth anniversary of his death in a US drone strike just outside Baghdad airport. (Photo by MEHR NEWS / AFP) (Photo by -/MEHR NEWS/AFP via Getty Images)

-/MEHR NEWS/AFP via Getty Images

Violence in Iran and Lebanon Prompts Concern Israel-Hamas War Could Expand

Iranian emergency services arrive at the site where two explosions in quick succession struck a crowd marking the anniversary of the 2020 killing of Guards general Qasem Soleimani, near the Saheb al-Zaman Mosque in the southern Iranian city of Kerman on January 3, 2024. The blasts, which state television called a “terrorist attack”, came with tensions running high in the Middle East a day after Hamas number two was killed in a Beirut drone strike. The blasts stuck near the Saheb al-Zaman Mosque in Kerman, Soleimani’s southern hometown where he is buried, as supporters gathered to mark the fourth anniversary of his death in a US drone strike just outside Baghdad airport. (Photo by MEHR NEWS / AFP) (Photo by -/MEHR NEWS/AFP via Getty Images)

-/MEHR NEWS/AFP via Getty Images

Violence in Iran and Lebanon Prompts Concern Israel-Hamas War Could Expand

Twin bombings in Iran and a senior Hamas leader killed in Lebanon are just two recent events that are prompting concern that the war between Israel and Hamas could be expanding to other parts of the Middle East. NPR correspondents Jane Arraf and Peter Kenyon, both with deep experience in the region, talk to All Things Considered host Mary Louise Kelly about the days events, and what it could mean for the stability of the region going forward. Email us at considerthis@npr.org

Iranian emergency services arrive at the site where two explosions in quick succession struck a crowd marking the anniversary of the 2020 killing of Guards general Qasem Soleimani, near the Saheb al-Zaman Mosque in the southern Iranian city of Kerman on January 3, 2024. The blasts, which state television called a “terrorist attack”, came with tensions running high in the Middle East a day after Hamas number two was killed in a Beirut drone strike. The blasts stuck near the Saheb al-Zaman Mosque in Kerman, Soleimani’s southern hometown where he is buried, as supporters gathered to mark the fourth anniversary of his death in a US drone strike just outside Baghdad airport. (Photo by MEHR NEWS / AFP) (Photo by -/MEHR NEWS/AFP via Getty Images)

-/MEHR NEWS/AFP via Getty Images

 

Twin bombings in Iran and a senior Hamas leader killed in Lebanon are just two recent events that are prompting concern that the war between Israel and Hamas could be expanding to other parts of the Middle East.

NPR correspondents Jane Arraf and Peter Kenyon, both with deep experience in the region, talk to All Things Considered host Mary Louise Kelly about the days events, and what it could mean for the stability of the region going forward.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org

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