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Trump Brings Back Birtherism Taunts

CONCORD, NEW HAMPSHIRE - JANUARY 19: Republican presidential candidate and former President Donald Trump addresses a campaign rally at the Grappone Convention Center on January 19, 2024 in Concord, New Hampshire. New Hampshire voters will weigh in next week on the Republican nominating race with their first-in-the-nation primary, about one week after Trump’s record-setting win in the Iowa caucuses. Former UN Ambassador and former South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley is hoping for a strong second-place showing so to continue her campaign into Nevada and South Carolina. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Trump Brings Back Birtherism Taunts

CONCORD, NEW HAMPSHIRE - JANUARY 19: Republican presidential candidate and former President Donald Trump addresses a campaign rally at the Grappone Convention Center on January 19, 2024 in Concord, New Hampshire. New Hampshire voters will weigh in next week on the Republican nominating race with their first-in-the-nation primary, about one week after Trump’s record-setting win in the Iowa caucuses. Former UN Ambassador and former South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley is hoping for a strong second-place showing so to continue her campaign into Nevada and South Carolina. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Trump Brings Back Birtherism Taunts

In a republican primary field that at one time boasted more than a dozen candidates, former South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley and former President Donald Trump are the last ones standing. That means Trump's fire is concentrated on Haley — a daughter of Indian immigrants. And he's using that heritage to try to undermine Haley's candidacy, and stoke concern about her legitimacy for the presidency. For the record, that concern is unfounded – Haley, as the Constitution dictates, is a natural-born US citizen. NPR's Mary Louise Kelly and Senior Editor and Correspondent Domenico Montanaro dissect the reasons WHY Trump keeps returning to this particular political playbook. Email us at considerthis@npr.org

CONCORD, NEW HAMPSHIRE - JANUARY 19: Republican presidential candidate and former President Donald Trump addresses a campaign rally at the Grappone Convention Center on January 19, 2024 in Concord, New Hampshire. New Hampshire voters will weigh in next week on the Republican nominating race with their first-in-the-nation primary, about one week after Trump’s record-setting win in the Iowa caucuses. Former UN Ambassador and former South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley is hoping for a strong second-place showing so to continue her campaign into Nevada and South Carolina. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

 

In a republican primary field that at one time boasted more than a dozen candidates, former South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley and former President Donald Trump are the last ones standing.

That means Trump's fire is concentrated on Haley — a daughter of Indian immigrants. And he's using that heritage to try to undermine Haley's candidacy, and stoke concern about her legitimacy for the presidency.

For the record, that concern is unfounded – Haley, as the Constitution dictates, is a natural-born US citizen.

NPR’s Mary Louise Kelly and Senior Editor and Correspondent Domenico Montanaro dissect the reasons WHY Trump keeps returning to this particular political playbook.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org

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