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In Israel, Anger At Netanyahu Getting Louder
In Israel, Anger At Netanyahu Getting Louder

In Israel, Anger At Netanyahu Getting Louder

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has spent a career defying political gravity. Now he's facing his biggest challenge yet. For decades, Netanyahu has sold himself as a leader who would keep Israelis safe. Instead, one of the world's strongest militaries failed to protect its citizens from a long-planned, Mad Max style invasion - with attackers from Gaza coming in on motorcycles, pickup trucks and hang gliders. Israeli authorities say 1,200 people were killed October 7th and more than 200 taken hostage. Netanyahu promised an investigation after the war with Hamas, but public outrage has grown louder in recent days. Now as public outrage grows in Israel, Netanyahu's future seems all but certain. And that future is inseparable from the future of Israel's war with Hamas, or an eventual peace in Gaza.

 

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has spent a career defying political gravity. Now he's facing his biggest challenge yet.

For decades, Netanyahu has sold himself as a leader who would keep Israelis safe.

Instead, one of the world's strongest militaries failed to protect its citizens from a long-planned, Mad Max style invasion - with attackers from Gaza coming in on motorcycles, pickup trucks and hang gliders. Israeli authorities say 1,200 people were killed October 7th and more than 200 taken hostage.

Netanyahu promised an investigation after the war with Hamas, but public outrage has grown louder in recent days.

Now as public outrage grows in Israel, Netanyahu's future seems all but certain. And that future is inseparable from the future of Israel's war with Hamas, or an eventual peace in Gaza.

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