Your NPR news source
US troops in the Middle East face a growing challenge

In this image provided by the UK Ministry of Defence, a Royal Air Force Typhoon FGR4 takes off to carry out air strikes against Houthi military targets in Yemen, from RAF Akrotiri, Cyprus, Monday, Jan. 22, 2024. The U.S. and British militaries bombed eight locations used by the Iranian-backed Houthis in Yemen on Monday night, the second time the two allies have conducted coordinated retaliatory strikes on an array of the rebels’ missile-launching capabilities. (AS1 Jake Green RAF/Ministry of Defence via AP)

AS1 Jake Green RAF/AP

US troops in the Middle East face a growing challenge

In this image provided by the UK Ministry of Defence, a Royal Air Force Typhoon FGR4 takes off to carry out air strikes against Houthi military targets in Yemen, from RAF Akrotiri, Cyprus, Monday, Jan. 22, 2024. The U.S. and British militaries bombed eight locations used by the Iranian-backed Houthis in Yemen on Monday night, the second time the two allies have conducted coordinated retaliatory strikes on an array of the rebels’ missile-launching capabilities. (AS1 Jake Green RAF/Ministry of Defence via AP)

AS1 Jake Green RAF/AP

US troops in the Middle East face a growing challenge

Ever since the start of the war between Israel and Hamas almost four months ago, U.S. leaders have been afraid that the conflict will grow. That could have consequences for American troops in the Middle East. Recently, U.S. forces have been attacked in Iraq by Iran-backed militias, for example. Host Ari Shapiro speaks with NPR's Jane Arraf in Amman, Jordan and NPR Pentagon correspondent Tom Bowman about what all this could mean for troops in the region. Email us at considerthis@npr.org

In this image provided by the UK Ministry of Defence, a Royal Air Force Typhoon FGR4 takes off to carry out air strikes against Houthi military targets in Yemen, from RAF Akrotiri, Cyprus, Monday, Jan. 22, 2024. The U.S. and British militaries bombed eight locations used by the Iranian-backed Houthis in Yemen on Monday night, the second time the two allies have conducted coordinated retaliatory strikes on an array of the rebels’ missile-launching capabilities. (AS1 Jake Green RAF/Ministry of Defence via AP)

AS1 Jake Green RAF/AP

 

Ever since the start of the war between Israel and Hamas almost four months ago, U.S. leaders have been afraid that the conflict will grow.

That could have consequences for American troops in the Middle East. Recently, U.S. forces have been attacked in Iraq by Iran-backed militias, for example.

Host Ari Shapiro speaks with NPR's Jane Arraf in Amman, Jordan and NPR Pentagon correspondent Tom Bowman about what all this could mean for troops in the region.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org

More From This Show
The Girl Scouts have been part of American childhood for generations. And now that quintessential experience is helping young girls, who are new to the United States get a sense of belonging. It comes through a Girl Scout troop based in one of New York City’s largest migrant shelters. The shelter has around 3,500 migrants, and all of the Girl Scouts are children of families seeking asylum. For the last few weeks, NPR’s Jasmine Garsd has been spending time with them, and brings us their their story. For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy