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What Vision Zero Has And Hasn't Accomplished

NEW YORK, NEW YORK - JULY 01: A memorial “ghost bike” sits in the place where a cyclist was recently killed by a truck in Manhattan on July 01, 2019 in New York City. As the nation’s largest city tries to balance an increasing number of bicyclists along its streets, the numbers of bike riders killed and injured continues to rise. Last Monday Robyn Hightman, 20, became the 12th cyclist killed on New York City streets in 2019; 10 were killed in 2018. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Spencer Platt/Getty Images

What Vision Zero Has And Hasn't Accomplished

NEW YORK, NEW YORK - JULY 01: A memorial “ghost bike” sits in the place where a cyclist was recently killed by a truck in Manhattan on July 01, 2019 in New York City. As the nation’s largest city tries to balance an increasing number of bicyclists along its streets, the numbers of bike riders killed and injured continues to rise. Last Monday Robyn Hightman, 20, became the 12th cyclist killed on New York City streets in 2019; 10 were killed in 2018. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Spencer Platt/Getty Images

What Vision Zero Has And Hasn't Accomplished

More than 100 people are killed on U.S. roads every day — more than 40,000 people a year. So, it seemed bold, if not crazy, when city leaders across the country began to set their sights on eliminating traffic fatalities completely. It has now been 10 years since U.S. cities began to adopt the approach known as Vision Zero. NPR's Joel Rose reports on what has worked and what hasn't. For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org

NEW YORK, NEW YORK - JULY 01: A memorial “ghost bike” sits in the place where a cyclist was recently killed by a truck in Manhattan on July 01, 2019 in New York City. As the nation’s largest city tries to balance an increasing number of bicyclists along its streets, the numbers of bike riders killed and injured continues to rise. Last Monday Robyn Hightman, 20, became the 12th cyclist killed on New York City streets in 2019; 10 were killed in 2018. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Spencer Platt/Getty Images

 

More than 100 people are killed on U.S. roads every day — more than 40,000 people a year. So, it seemed bold, if not crazy, when city leaders across the country began to set their sights on eliminating traffic fatalities completely.

It has now been 10 years since U.S. cities began to adopt the approach known as Vision Zero.

NPR's Joel Rose reports on what has worked and what hasn't.

For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org

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